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On Saturday 10th June, BBC Radio 3 broadcast an hour-long programme on Argentine tango.

The programme was part of a longer series "the Sound of Dance" by Katie Derham, presenter of the BBC Proms and Strictly Come Dancing finalist, exploring the relationship between music and different dance genres.

Bandoneon player Julian Rowlands was interviewed to give a tango musician's perspective and David and I were interviewed to speak about the music from a dancer's point of view.

It was really interesting to talk about how we feel when we dance tango, how we interpret the music and how we improvise. There are not many programmes in the mainstream media that delve into the world and workings of traditional "tango salon" (or social tango dancing). It made a refreshing change!

We tried as much as possible to talk about the dance form as an improvised dance form, explaining that this is tango's most authentic form. For us this is one of the features that make the music so exciting to interpret. And it is one of the features of tango that many people are unaware of.

It is always a challenge to talk about dance without being able to demonstrate the movements. But the interview was expertly edited, overlaying the music so as to illustrate to the audience what we were trying to describe.

Here you can listen to us talking to Katie. We hope you find it interesting too!

At the end of June, the Queens Tango Festival is coming to London!

The Queens Tango Festival will celebrate the role of the follower in tango, with Ladies Technique workshops over the course of four days, as well as workshops for leaders focusing on the follower’s needs.

The Festival is co-organised by London tango teacher, Raquel Greenberg and the Queen of Tango Queens, Alejandra Mantiñan, who will be visiting London that weekend.

I feel honoured to have been invited to take part as the third female contributor.

So since everyone knows that it takes two to tango, why the need for a Festival that focuses mainly on the woman?

In my first few years of studying tango, I often felt that the role of the follower was overlooked in many of the group classes I took. The emphasis of the class was very much what the leader should do, with perhaps the occasional nod towards the follower.

Old school tango teaching was very much of the philosophy that the woman simply needed to follow. Any difficulty she had was always the fault of the leader. This of course can be quite a convenient get-out clause for us followers, yet we know in our hearts that there is plenty we can be doing to improve our tango. Plus we’d actually appreciate some guidance on how to achieve this!

But times have changed and Ladies Technique has developed enormously in the last 15 years.

And in the forefront of this movement is Alejandra Mantiñan. Alejandra’s tango career spans more than three decades. She stands out in the male-dominated world of tango and has inspired a whole generation of tango dancers. She has proved that the woman in tango can make a huge contribution to the creative partnership, that her role is to follow her partner, yes, but not purely so.

I will be giving a Ladies Technique workshop on Saturday 24th June as part of the Festival. I believe that with a clear understanding of technique, and practice, beautiful dancers soon emerge. The class will focus on foundation technique as well as styling and decorations. Click here for more information on this Workshop.

On Sunday 25th June, David and I will be performing at the Closing Milonga of the Festival. David will also perform with Alejandra on the same night. This is our next official Tango Movement Night Out and we hope you’ll join us. The venue is La Divina Milonga in Marylebone. More details to follow closer to the time!

Last Saturday 3rd June, our two-week workshop series on the "Caminata" and tango embrace got off to a flying start.

Students first thinking of taking tango classes are often lured in by an enticing promise: if you can walk, you can tango!

This would convince even the most nervous of students to try a class. And every word of it is true! Tango - in its essence - is simply a walk. A beautiful, elegant, refined walk, yes, but just a walk.

But then they drop the bombshell: it takes a lifetime to learn the tango walk!

In fact, they don't even need to tell you that. You worked that out in your first class! You know that feeling when you're giving someone your telephone number and suddenly you can't for the life of you remember it? That's how it feels when you suddenly realise that you can't work out how to walk!

So yes, the tango walk is not the easiest skill to accomplish in tango but it is an important one and a rewarding one. And it requires a little bit of dedication.

So last week, we cast other movements in tango aside to focus on our "caminata" and of course the wonderful tango embrace, an intrinsic part of the tango walk. Like the walk, giving someone a hug in every day life is a natural thing, but in tango it becomes something of an art.

It was amazing to see how in 2 hours so many different concepts and angles were explored. And yet we felt we had barely scratched the surface.

The response we had to the workshop was enthusiastic with many requests for the workshop to become a regular feature in our timetable. We are looking forward to developing the themes in Part II of the workshop this Saturday.

Don't worry if you missed Part I and don't worry if you don't have a partner - we'll be rotating partners throughout the class.

For more information on this Saturday's class, please click here.

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