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A mini-clip of our improvised tango at the end of our Intermediate Drop-in Class last Tuesday, illustrating our step of the week.

It always feels amazing when David leads this step so I was excited to share it with you.

When you watch this video you’ll see the series of steps taught, but what you won’t necessarily see are the tiny details that go into making this step look - and just as importantly feel - a million dollars! Those are secrets for those who come to our lessons!

No step looks or feels good without a solid bedrock of technique. And so the first part of the class was spent working with our students to understand how to initiate and execute the movements.

We hope you enjoy this clip. Any questions, just let us know in class!

Newcomers are always more than welcome. Check out our Weekly Class Schedule for the right level for you.

A video of our improvised demonstration at the end of our Intermediate Tango Class on Tuesday 5 September.

As always, the focus of the class was not to memorise the sequence but to understand how to lead each element of the sequence and play around with them creatively.

Tuesday’s class involved leading the follower lovely series of movements down the leader’s right hand side finishing with the lead of the front boleo. A step that feels as beautiful as it looks!

We worked with the followers to help them release their free leg to create more dynamic boleos and gave them a few ideas for decorations. Creativity in tango is not solely the territory of the leader!

This video clip features the step sequence several times (can you spot it?) but shows how it can be slotted into other tango movements too. As always the music is a top priority!

Any questions about this step or any other tango matter, just let us know in class!

We hope this video is a helpful reminder of your lesson and serves as some inspiration for your dance!

Giro Technique 11-09-2017

Another workshop series has come and gone.

For the last two Saturdays, Tango Movement students have been working on their giros (tango turns). Exploring the technique, working on their fluidity and getting that bit closer to precision!

When you watch a video of a performance filmed in a milonga in Buenos Aires, it is most often the moment in which a giro is executed that the audience erupts into applause.

Something that may surprise a British audience. In Strictly Come Dancing, the audience seems to clap for every single lift, spin and flick. You can almost visualise the man behind the camera holding up an autocue card for them: “APPLAUD”.

This is something of a role-reversal considering Argentine audiences are generally considered to be more expressive than British audiences, never shy to call out “Bravisimo!” or to jump to their feet in a standing ovation.

So why so much enthusiasm for giros? The giro typically is where the leader’s technique can shine. Often said to be the frame to the beautiful painting that is the follower in tango, this is the gentleman’s moment to step out into the spotlight, where he can really show what he is made of.

Enrosques, planeos, lápices, entradas, even ganchos - the variations for tango turns are endless. Whereas the follower usually maintains the same series of steps around the leader: forward, side, back, side …

But as I always tell my students, around every leader, walks a strong follower! The leader’s success is wholly dependant on the solid technique of the follower. Something that as our ladies discovered in class on Saturday is no mean feat!

This coming Saturday and next, we won’t be drifting too far away from the principles we learnt on Saturday. We will be running a two-week Pure Tango Technique Course, in which we will continue to explore - amongst other things - some of the foundation principles of giros.

For full info: click here.

See you there!

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