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On Sunday 6th September, we will be performing in Angels & Demons with acclaimed septet Tango Siempre and Soprano Ann Liebeck.

Discover the tango masterworks of legendary Argentine composer Astor Piazzolla. In the 1950s, Piazzolla shook up the world of traditional tango with his new style termed 'nuevo tango', incorporating elements from jazz and classical music. Although controversial during his lifetime, he soon became an important musical figure and is now known as one of the world's foremost composers of tango music.

Angels and Demons features Piazzolla's rarely performed vocal tango ballads, plus instrumental works by classic tango masters of the Golden Age of Tango.

The concert also features a guest appearance by baritone Nuno Silva.

'Here is the tango: raw, intoxicating, speaking with its true voice' (Financial Times)

Purcell Room at Queen Elizabeth Hall

Performers:

Ann Liebeck soprano
Nuno Silva baritone
Julian Rowlands bandoneon
Ros Stephen violin
Marianne Haynes violin
Felix Tanner viola
Laura Anstee cello
Jonathan Taylor piano
Rory Dempsey double bass
David Benitez tango dancer
Kim Benitez tango dancer

Programme:

Jonathan Taylor: Malandras
Eduardo Rovira: A Evaristo Carriego
Astor Piazzolla: Milonga de la Anunciación
Julian Plaza: Danzarín
Pedro Laurenz: Milonga de mis Amores
Juan de Dios Filiberto: Quejas de Bandoneón
Astor Piazzolla: Chiquilín de Bachín
Rosita Melo: Desde el Alma
Jonathan Taylor: El Gato negro
Astor Piazzolla: Vuelvo al Sur
Interval
Astor Piazzolla: Milonga del Angel
Astor Piazzolla: Zum
Osvaldo Pugliese: La Yumba
Astor Piazzolla: Milonga Carrieguera
Julian Plaza: Payadora
Astor Piazzolla: Balada para un Loco
Mario Demarco: Pata Ancha
Astor Piazzolla: Balada para mi muerte
Astor Piazzolla: Libertango

For tickets, click here.

student show 21-08-2015

We’re proud to present the official video of our Student Show, which took place at the UK Tango Championships in June this year.

Our Students opened the Semi-Finals with a choreography to the music Loca by Juan D’Arienzo.

The students came from our intermediate and advanced groups and the majority had started tango with us as Beginners.

They worked hard in the run-up to the performance to perfect not only their movements but their togetherness with the group - which if you’ve ever tried it, you’ll know is no easy feat!

Our aim had been to show the essence of tango with quality of movement, elegance and musicality. And guys, we’ve got to hand it to you - you had that in spades!

Although a little nervous before going out to perform in front of so many people, the students kept calm and held it together. It was amazing to see them all looking so composed and so glamorous out there!

We were very, very proud of them and can’t WAIT till our next Student Show at our Annual Winter Ball on Saturday 14th November.

Yesterday in our Milonga Workshop, I was working with a group of three followers on their technique.

We were working on a combination of milonga steps: back, change, forward, extend, change, boleo … repeat.

Once they were comfortable - first with the movements and then with the music - I told them they were still missing something: “onda”. Milonga is not milonga unless you give it a bit of “onda”.

Two of them had never heard the word. The third - a Spanish speaker - looked a little mystfied: “Wave?” She asked.

I thought for a second. “Onda” can mean many different things depending on the circumstances. In Argentina, it is not uncommon to hear that a place has “buena onda” - a good energy. If someone dresses well, he has “toda la onda". And if someone does you a good turn, you might say: “que buena onda!” - how nice of you!

When you dance and you give it “onda” it means something subtly different. I grasped for the word in English for a moment and came up with: sass! Ladies, you’ve got to give it some sass! Let the music inspire your movements!

But we know that it isn’t so easy. As a follower - and especially in milonga which is quite a bit faster than tango - your brain is almost completely occupied with just responding to the lead. (And Leaders, yes I know, it is not easy for you either!) Just remembering to do anything else other than simply follow can be quite a task. And of course you’ll also be trying to keep a good posture, extend your legs and all the other technique tips your teacher has given you.

But with time and especially with partners that you have a connection with, this will become less all-absorbing and you’ll feel you have more time to breathe! And - hopefully - you’ll start feeling that you can start allowing your personality to come out.

Remember always that whether we’re learning milonga, vals or tango, our first step is to become a follower and our second step is to become a dancer!

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